Guinea Pig Handling

Guinea pigs are social creatures that love being handled. To create a greater bond with a guinea pig, you can spend time with them to allow them to feel comfortable and safe around you. One way to spend time with your guinea pig is by handling them.

Make sure to wash your hands before and after you hold your guinea pig. To minimize any harm to you or your guinea pig, always use both hands when picking it up.

To …

Grooming Guinea Pigs

Grooming your guinea pig (cavy) is a good way to handle, interact, and bond with your pet. It is also a time to examine your animal for any changes in its overall health.

Your guinea pig must feel secure when being handled and groomed. Before you begin the grooming process, put a low-pile rug or carpet sample on the top of a sturdy table. Place your pet on the covered table and get it used to being handled while on …

Bladder Stones in Guinea Pigs

What are bladder stones?

Uroliths (bladder stones) are mineral structures that form in the bladder.  These uroliths can remain in the bladder or get stuck in the urethra during urination. Sometimes small stones can pass as the guinea pig urinates but more often they cause a problem that can be life threatening. Uroliths can cause irritation to the bladder wall, bloody urine, or can completely block the urethra.

Bladder sludge is defined as gritty particles that accumulate in the bladder …

Getting Ready to Bring A Guinea Pig Home

Guinea pigs make excellent pets for individuals and families. They do not take up much space and are relatively easy to care for. If you decide to bring a guinea pig home, be prepared before the big arrival. Essentials to have on hand include a cage, hut (hiding place), bedding, feed, feed crock, water bottle, and toys.

Cage:

Your new guinea pig will need a place to play, eat, sleep and feel secure. When selecting a cage, make sure it’s …

Bumblefoot in Companion Rodents

Pododermatitis, more commonly known as bumblefoot, is a condition that affects many companion rodents, including rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs. Pododermatitis literally means “inflammation of the foot.”  The footpad becomes inflamed, develops sores and “bumbles,”  (which often start out as small red bumps), and then can become overgrown. The condition occurs when the animal’s feet become inflicted with tiny cuts and scrapes caused by a variety of environmental conditions. Bacteria are then able to enter the footpad through these cuts …